Bleu, Blanc, Rouge – Vive la France!

Maybe you already got an idea of the fact that there is something special about this video we made for Bastille Day, the French National Day. We used the colors from the French Flag as a theme for the video. To find the right shots to create this video we used our color search we added to our shop several months ago. This made it a lot easier to find the best shots with the colors we wanted to have in our clip. This is just one example where the color search supports the keyword search. It can help in many other scenarios where you search for shots that contain a certain color. Just try it yourself.

The Eagle has Landed – The flight of Apollo 11

The Apollo-Program was one of the most ambitious projects of the 20th century. But the moon landing was not only a big event for space travel, but also for Television. The live broadcast on July 20, 1969 broke many records for the attendance and the longest live broadcast. To remember this milestone in human history, we scanned and published this film about the moon landing made by NASA.

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first humans on the Moon, Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, on July 20, 1969, at 20:18 UTC. Armstrong became the first to step onto the lunar surface six hours later on July 21 at 02:56 UTC. Launched by a Saturn V rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Merritt Island, Florida, on July 16, Apollo 11 was the fifth manned mission of NASA’s Apollo program.

Apollo 11 effectively ended the Space Race and fulfilled a national goal proposed in 1961 by the late US President John F. Kennedy in a speech before the United States Congress, “before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth.”

D-Day To Germany

The film “D-Day To Germany” was shot from June to November 1944 by the cinematographer Jack Lieb, who was working as war correspondent for the newsreel News of the Day. Twenty-five years later, Lieb recorded spoken narration. Lieb shot silent color footage of the “Operation Overlord” with his own 16mm camera. His commentary create a unique, personal recollection of that momentous time. He had used a 35mm black and white camera to film war coverage for the newsreels and his 16mm home movie camera to shoot color film to show to his family back home. After the war, Lieb edited the color footage.

The film starts with images from London shot in May 1944. Lieb then joins a group of war correspondents at the south coast of England that will cover the invasion. Personalities such as Larry LeSueur from CBS, Wharton Becker, Jack Thompson of the Chicago Tribune, Scripps-Howard Newspapers’ Ernie Pyle, Larry O’Riley of Associated Press, Clark Lee of INS and Chicago Daily News’ William Stoneman, Edward G. Robinson, Bob Landry, Robert Capa and others appear. The correspondents made their way to Franc together with the 101 Airborne Division.

Lieb landed on Utah Beach after the fighting was over. He added some british footage, shot with an automated camera to his film, that shows the landing of the first troops in Normandy. The footage shows some moments when the war correspondents and soldiers had down time, but the job was not safe or easy. His correspondent colleagues Ernie Pyle and Bill Stringer, that you can see in the film, were killed. Jack Liebs film shows scenes from the liberation of Paris and the campaign in France and in Aachen. Lieb returned safely to the States, half a year before the fighting in Europe came to an end. The scenes from Berlin were added from newsreel clips to his film.

Jack Lieb ends his comment that one day we will learn how to avoid wars!

More archival footage can be found on our history youtube channel “Timeline” and at framepool’s stock footage shop.

Brazilian enthusiasm for soccer captured with the ARRI AMIRA

Framepool is proud to offer some of the newest and best shots from Brazil, filmed with the recently released ARRI AMIRA.

The FIFA World Cup in Brazil will be starting soon. This event inspired documentary filmmaker Jens Hoffmann to create a documentary about young Brazilian soccer player. He started this project, called Mata Mata (all or nothing), three years ago. He began his work using the ARRI ALEXA, because the dynamic range was very important for his project. The great range allowed him to film even in poor or heavily changing lighting conditions. In September 2013, ARRI presented the ARRI AMIRA, a more sophisticated version of the ALEXA, which is specifically designed to meet the needs of documentary filmmakers. During progress of his film project, Jens Hoffmann got the opportunity to try the new AMIRA. He used this camera for shots of children playing soccer in Rio de Janeiro in the district Cidade de Deu (City of God), which became famous by the movie with the same name. The AMIRA was selected for these recordings to capture the action of the football game in slow motion at 200 fps. This shoot was also a crucial test for the AMIRA. The action-packed scenes, at around 40° C with a lot of dust and dirt, put the camera and the camera man to the test. The complete interview with the filmmaker can be found at ARRI News.

Some of the fantastic results of this video shot are already available for licensing at framepool. Even if the footage is not online at our website yet, you can license them with support of our sales staff.

The world of film is a world of color

The world of film is a world of color – at least since the middle of last century. But until now, at most of stock footage archives, you could only conduct your footage search with black & white keywords. Consequently, this complicated the path from your idea to the perfect shot. However, patterns and color contained in an image can now widen the circle where just words reach their limits.

Our new footage search by similarity “Visual Search” extends search capabilities within the Framepool webshop significantly. Now it is possible to find and sort our shots by color and other visual information, and you can discover similar footage by using a reference shot. The purely visual information of a shot can now be used to conduct a more sophisticated conceptual search.

Just give the visual search a try and let the results speak for themselves!

The real Monuments Men at Work: Berchtesgaden July 1945

This newsreel footage produced in Germany by the US Group Control Council (USGCC) in August 1945 shows the loading of looted art in Berchtesgaden and Neuschwanstein Castle.

In June 1945 the Munich Central Collecting Point was opened in the former Nazi Party Headquarters close to the Königsplatz downtown Munich. Central Collecting Points were established in Munich and Wiesbaden, to house and sort the thousands of works of art being found by Monuments Men in repositories across Southern Germany, and the Central Collecting Point in Munich was designated to primarily hold ERR (Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg) loot, Hitler and Goering’s collections, and other masterpieces found in Berchtesgaden, Neuschwanstein and the Altaussee salt mine.   

Volcanoes – Fear and Fascination

Volcanoes fascinate but spread fear and terror at the same time. They can devastate whole regions during a very short timeframe, but also provide the basis for new life. The lava emerging from a volcanic eruption gives rise to islands and creates mineral-rich soils where plants grow well. Thanks to these fertile soils, roughly half a billion people worldwide live in close proximity to active volcanoes. Many of them are well aware of the danger – but they take this risk in exchange for abundant crops and warm thermal water. Especially on Iceland and in Japan, bathing in hot springs is very popular. But not only the physical well-being benefits from the hot water, it is also being used for energy production.   

Yummy, yummy

Are you hungry? Then this video is nothing for you. You should at least have a deliciously looking carrot in reach before pressing the “play” button. ‘Cause this video is made by real gourmets. Foods are shown in their most appetizing perspective: vegetables or meat, milk or wine, herbs or honey – everything so fresh and juicy, creamy and crunchy, luscious and mouth-watering that you will hardly stand not taking a bite of your carrot. It’s already too late? Then please go on – bon appétit!

BTW: Even we are slow food fans, our footage is being delivered so fast that working on your project will become a pure relish.

Winter Olympics, 50 Years ago…

Only a few more days until the opening of the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi. Some of our colleagues (real fans…) are already watching archive videos of ski and bobsled races to get trained for the upcoming spectacle. Even it might be thrilling for only very few people to study vast amounts of ice skater movements, we thought that the following video is really diverting – it covers a US reportage of the Winter Olympic Games in Innsbruck, exactly 50 years ago.

Let’s wait and see if Sochi can compete with Innsbruck in terms of new sports, tourist attractions and elegant winter fashion ;-)

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